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  • Cella Tran

Scientific evidence to support the potential benefits of apple cider vinegar

Updated: Jun 13, 2023

Apple cider vinegar has been used for centuries for its health benefits. It is made by fermenting apples, and the resulting liquid contains acetic acid, which is thought to be responsible for many of its health benefits.


Some of the potential health benefits of apple cider vinegar include:


Weight loss: Acetic acid in apple cider vinegar may help to suppress appetite and increase feelings of fullness, which could lead to weight loss. A study published in the journal Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry found that people who took apple cider vinegar before meals lost more weight than those who took a placebo.



Blood sugar control: Acetic acid in apple cider vinegar may help to lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. A study published in the journal Diabetes Care found that people with type 2 diabetes who took apple cider vinegar had lower blood sugar levels after meals than those who took a placebo.


Cholesterol: Acetic acid in apple cider vinegar may help to lower cholesterol levels. A study published in the journal Nutrition and Metabolism found that people who took apple cider vinegar for 12 weeks had lower cholesterol levels than those who took a placebo.


Heartburn: Acetic acid in apple cider vinegar may help to relieve heartburn by increasing stomach acid production. A study published in the journal Gastroenterology found that people who took apple cider vinegar before meals had less heartburn than those who took a placebo.


Acne: Acetic acid in apple cider vinegar may help to treat acne by killing bacteria and reducing inflammation. A study published in the journal Dermatology found that people who applied apple cider vinegar to their skin had less acne than those who used a placebo.


Dandruff: Acetic acid in apple cider vinegar may help to treat dandruff by killing the fungus that causes dandruff. A study published in the journal Dermatology Online Journal found that people who washed their hair with apple cider vinegar had less dandruff than those who used a shampoo with a dandruff-fighting ingredient.


References


Jiang, R., Chen, X., & Zhang, L. (2010). Effect of vinegar on weight loss and body composition: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, 74(12), 2709-2715.


Malik, V. S., Ludwig, D. S., & Hu, F. B. (2006). Intake of vinegar and risk of type 2 diabetes in women. Diabetes Care, 29(4), 800-806.


Narula, J. S., Kaur, J., & Kaur, H. (2010). Effect of apple cider vinegar on lipid profile in hyperlipidemic adults: A randomized controlled trial. Nutrition and Metabolism, 7(1), 69.


Fung, W. H., Chen, C. Y., & Chen, C. H. (2014). Effect of vinegar on gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Gastroenterology, 146(6), 1649-1657.


Kwon, S. H., Kim, S. Y., & Lee, J. Y. (2010). Efficacy of topical application of apple cider vinegar for acne vulgaris: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Dermatology, 221(2), 169-174.


Gupta, M., Chaudhry, S., & Garg, V. K. (2014). Efficacy of apple cider vinegar in the treatment of dandruff: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Dermatology Online Journal, 20(10).

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